What the EU trade deal with Japan tells us

After many years of negotiation, the EU announced this week that it has finalised a trade deal with Japan, the world’s third largest economy.

The deal will remove ‘almost entirely’ any tariffs on trade between that country and the EU bloc.

Unsurprisingly, supporters of remaining in the EU have been gleefully pointing out that such a deal proves that the UK needs to stay in to gain advantages that we will lose upon Brexit.

But let’s look at just what the deal means.

Whilst gaining tariff free access to the Single Market, Japan will retain full border control, make no payments to the EU, will not be subject to rulings from the ECJ or Directives from The Commission and will be able to make its own trade deals in the future. Isn’t this what the EU have been saying is impossible in the ongoing Brexit ‘negotiations’ due to the ‘integrity’ of the Single Market?

If they can give such a deal to Japan, why not to the UK – a country with whom they have far larger trade at the present time? Indeed, Article 8 of The Lisbon Treaty states –

The Union shall develop a special relationship with neighbouring countries, aiming to establish an area of prosperity and good neighbourliness, founded on the values of the Union and characterised by close and peaceful relations based on cooperation.

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A picture of life outside the European Union (EU) – 2020

You will hear a lot of scare stories about how our country will struggle if we leave the EU from those in the ‘Yes’ campaign.

Here is what it could really be like……..

 

EDP pictures 028The year is 2020 and Britain is adjusting to life and thriving outside of the declining European Union.

Free from the need to negotiate trade deals via unelected EU commissioners, a series of agreements with the emerging nations of the world have boosted exports and revitalised our industries. Unwilling to lose their largest European market, the remaining EU states have swiftly confirmed free trade agreements with the UK and the job losses predicted by the ‘Yes’ campaign fail to materialise.

Re-engaging with our traditional world partners, most notably the Commonwealth, has invigorated our shipping industries and cities such as Liverpool and Glasgow once again hum to the sound of machinery as exports grow and vessels come and go, offloading such produce as New Zealand lamb and transporting out machinery exports, pharmaceuticals and high tech equipment.

With much of the EU red tape removed from our small and medium industries they once again start to drive economic growth. Repeal of EU diktat on renewable energy and the large combustion plant directive means that energy once again becomes cheaper, driving down costs for businesses and making them more competitive on the world stage.

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