UKIP Leadership election – Why I am backing Peter Whittle

 

UKIP battle busThe BREXIT vote of 23rd June was a momentous occasion for UKIP and a seismic shock for politics in our country.

With the mainstream media and the establishment predicting a victory for the remain campaign and doing their best to ensure it, the people of the UK showed belief in our ability to not just survive but thrive as an independent, outward looking and globally trading nation.

But with the achievement of UKIP’s founding goal , those same commentators quickly turned their sights on the party and questioned whether we had a future with this core plank of our policy apparently removed. What next for UKIP?

Nigel Farage, the driving force that caused the referendum, stepped down as leader of the party – after 20 years of fighting against the EU elites and ridicule from many quarters he stated that he wanted to get his life back. Having seen how hard he had worked to the detriment of both his health and family, only the hardest heart would begrudge him the chance to rebuild some sort of personal normality.

A leadership election swiftly followed but many of the biggest names within the party did not stand and the victor, Diane James MEP, felt that she could not do the job after just 18 days in charge – to her credit, she acknowledged this early rather than persevering with a position that could have quickly become untenable and damaged the party further.

This has led to a second election where some of the ‘big beasts’ have joined the fray and an interesting contest has ensued.

Peter Whittle – 

I first encountered Peter Whittle at the Party Conference in London in 2013. His speech as a representative of the New Culture Forum, a think tank he heads up, not only hit a chord with me but also with those in the hall who gave him a standing ovation at the end of it.

That speech can be viewed here –

 

I contacted Peter shortly afterwards and asked him if he could come and do a public meeting in Hillingdon – he was only too happy to do so. Indeed, since then he has spoken at three meetings in our area in Hayes End, Uxbridge and West Drayton. His willingness to engage, even on a cold night in the middle of Winter when we had a relatively poor attendance at one of the events, speaks volumes. That particular event garnered two new members who have gone on to be amongst our best activists because of his inspirational oratory.

His interest in the grassroots soon became apparent to us in Hillingdon. When we were looking to do a fundraiser and asked party luminaries for donations to the raffle, Peter very kindly posted us signed copies of the six books he has written on cultural issues which helped to generate the cash for our general election campaign.

The New Culture Forum

brexit-revolt-bannerPeter has a background in the media and when he returned from the US he set up a think tank in London based around cultural issues.

He has invited both myself and other rank and file ‘footsoldiers’  to a number of the events where a range of speakers have been present. Amongst the highlights have been a talk from Rafe Heydal-Mankou on the erosion of London culture in the face of the globalisation of our City, Douglas Murray on the threat to our country from Radical Islamism and the launch of the the ‘BREXIT Revolt’ book shortly after the EU Referendum which was attended by a number of those involved in the campaign including Nigel Farage and Arron Banks. It has struck me at these events that Peter values the input of the ordinary member and that invitations have not been restricted to the ‘great and the good’ – he has invited those who have worked with him on campaigns, irrespective of background.

The GLA Elections

Many have said that London is a world apart and not ‘UKIP Territory’. As our Mayoral candidate and head of the party list in 2016, Peter tore that particular myth up and together with David Kurten got our first seats on the London Assembly for over ten years.

Working with active branches in London, Peter was not afraid to meet people on the street in areas where the media would have you believe that we would not be welcome. One particular event in Uxbridge sticks with me where we were accused of being ‘homophobes and racists’ – after Peter and David spoke with the three individuals in question, they engaged and left with UKIP manifestoes in hand, quite shocked by the difference between MSM rhetoric and the reality. His calm demeanour and willingness to engage certainly made a mark.

In the face of a hostile media he also garnered good reviews as the party spokesman during the campaign – even the likes of The Guardian found it hard to say a bad word!

After election, Peter also came back to the area and spoke with residents on a demonstration in Harmondsworth against the Third Runway – this was commented on by campaigners who were not used to seeing politicians when they did not need votes to put them in to position and has helped us immensely where some would have questioned our commitment to the cause.

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Since assuming his position as the leader of the UKIP GLA group, Peter has made a fine start in holding London Mayor Sadiq Khan to account. His team have been in constant touch with our branch to find out what people in our area need and to this end have questioned the Mayor over PHV drivers in Harlington, the Third Runway (Forcing Khan in to endorsing Gatwick) and his reluctance to confront Islamist extremists from Hezbollah on the streets of London. When EU flags were raised over City Hall after the election of the Labour Mayor, Peter and David pushed a motion asking for them to be removed and replaced with the Cross of St George – to the shame of the other members of the Assembly, the Tories abstained and Labour opposed.

Peter has also grilled Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe on the lack of convictions for FGM, a crime that is now unfortunately prevalent in our part of London.

Whilst UKIP need to be ready to fight for a proper BREXIT it is to Peter’s credit that he not only acknowledges that but with his partner on the GLA is ready to look beyond a successful outcome and build a fighting force that confronts the establishment parties on domestic issues that affect us all. In interviews with the BBC he has also confirmed that UKIP needs to build and fight Labour in the North where the next major breakthroughs will be made as we push on to replace Labour as the main opposition in Westminster.

Why Peter Whittle?

I mentioned before that we now have a proper leadership election. I have worked with Paul Nuttall before and am a big fan. especially on his stance over an English Parliament – he would make a fine leader of our party.

I know very little of John Rees-Evans but have heard good things from those who have worked with him in Wales.

However, having worked with Peter over the last few years I would like to think that we have developed from colleagues to friends. He speaks my language when it comes to putting the pride back in to our country, working to establish a community based around a shared vision for our future. A future where working class people like Peter, a grammar school boy from Shooters Hill, can fulfil their potential.

A leader who acknowledges the work of the grassroots and is there to help us build the party from the ground up as he has done for our branch since our first meeting.

We can have a ‘safe pair of hands’ or we can reach for something more, achieve UKIP’s potential and change our country for the better in a post BREXIT world.

I believe that Peter Whittle is the man who can lead our party and our country to a better future – that is why I am endorsing him for leadership of UKIP and would urge you to do the same.

Peter Whittle and CD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Your chance to meet UKIP London Mayoral candidate Peter Whittle

UKIP Hillingdon are proud to announce our latest public meeting and give you the chance to quiz our candidate for London Mayor, Peter Whittle.

Date – Thursday 19th November

Venue – RAFA Battle of Britain Club, Hillingdon Road, Uxbridge, UB10 0RY

Doors open at 7.15pm for a 7.30pm start

Speeches to be followed by an open floor Q&A session. There will be time afterwards at the bar to meet the candidates.

Easily accessible by public transport including the 427 and 607 bus from Uxbridge Station, the club is on the main A4020 opposite The Greenway and Jack’s fish & chip shop.

                                                          SpeakersPeterr Whittle 1

Peter Whittle is UKIP’s Culture Spokesman and a proud Londoner. A successful media figure and founder member of the influential New Culture Forum think tank, he stood in the recent General Election for UKIP in Eltham.

David Kurten

David Kurten is one of our leading GLA list candidates. A Chemistry Teacher and Improv Theatre Trainer, David will give his unique insight into the issues facing Londoners today.

Chaired by UKIP Hillingdon’s Cliff Dixon

We hope to see you there!

Introducing Peter Whittle – UKIP mayoral candidate

I received the following press release earlier today from Peter Whittle, one of the UKIP candidates for London Mayor.

Peter has been a very good friend to our branch in Hillingdon – I am happy to post it here and offer my best wishes for a successful campaign…..

 

For Immediate Release, Friday August 29th 2014
 
 Peter Whittle London Calling19-01
Today I’m launching the website for my campaign to stand as the UKIP candidate for London Mayor: www.peterwhittle.london
The site will allow us to measure which issues are the most important to Londoners. It carries features which allow people to pledge support or just find out more about UKIP in London.

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Public meetings and Hustings events

With the General Election campaign moving in to it’s final stages, the following local meetings will give you a chance to question the candidates and hear what their party’s propose for our area.

UKIP Public meeting – Thursday 23rd April (St George’s Day)

Start time – 8.15pm

Venue – West Drayton Community Centre, Harmondsworth Road, West Drayton, UB7 9JL

Peterr Whittle 1Headline speaker is UKIP’s culture and communities spokesman, Peter Whittle. (Left)

A noted author and media broadcaster, Peter also founded and heads up The New Culture Forum think tank.

Support speaker will be UKIP’s Hayes & Harlington candidate and Hillingdon branch Chairman, Cliff Dixon.

A Q&A session will follow their short presentations

 

 

Uxbridge & South Ruislip Constituency hustings – Sunday 26th April

Start time – 7.30pm

Venue – Yiewsley Baptist Church, Colham Avenue, Yiewsley, UB7 8HE

jack duffin 1The third and final hustings for the constituency, UKIP will be represented by our candidate Jack Duffin (Left)

Boris Johnson will again be absent as he is ‘too busy’ to attend.

 

 

Hayes & Harlington Constituency hustings – Tuesday 28th April

Start Time – 7.30pm

Venue – St Anselm’s Church, Station Road, Hayes, UB3 4DF

CD leaflet image jpegOrganised by The Hillingdon Interfaith network, UKIP will be represented by our candidate, Cliff Dixon (Left)

Labour, Conservative, Green and Lib-Dem candidates will also be on show.

 

 

Ruislip, Northwood & Pinner constituency – Thursday 30th April

Start Time – 7.30pm

Venue – Northwood & Pinner Liberal Synagogue, Oaklands Gate, Green Lane, Northwood, HA6 3AA

Harefield Pub meeting Feb 15 GerardThe final hustings for the constituency, UKIP will be represented by our candidate, Gerard Barry. (Left)

 

 

 

We hope to see some of you there

A response to Bill Oddie

The following is a response from UKIP Culture spokesman Peter Whittle to Bill Oddie’s comments about British families  

Profile_Pic.jpgUKIP Culture Spokesman Peter Whittle said: “Bill Oddie’s remarks this weekend, in which he described his shame at being British, and that the size of British families need ‘to be contained’ in the face of over population, were odious and misinformed.

“If they had been made about any other country or its people, he would almost certainly be facing the sack.

“The TV personality, whose salary as presenter of the BBC’s SpringWatch, is effectively paid by British taxpayers, talked of the British as being a ‘horrible race’.

“Such bigoted comments reveal a very distorted view and a complete ignorance of the facts. British families, like their counterparts in Europe, are on average small; indeed the indigenous populations of most European countries have been in steady decline for some time.

“In fact, the current and ongoing population boom in Britain is driven overwhelmingly by mass immigration.

“It might be easy to dismiss Mr Oddie’s remarks were in not for the fact that they are unfortunately typical of an attitude which has been unduly influential in British society for far too long. An unquestioning preference for mass immigration, a disdain for ordinary British people and a distaste for Britain itself, are knee-jerk prejudices all too often prevelant amongst those who shape our cultural landscape.

“We must challenge at every opportunity this kind of ill-informed, self-hating bigotry.”

The Changing Face of London on Film

UKIP Culture Spokesman Peter Whittle looks at the evolution of acting and film in modern day London in this piece from Standpoint Magazine

 

Whittle’s London in the new edition of Standpoint looks at the capital on film:
Young+Terrence+Stamp.jpg (198×240)
 
‘Like politics, acting seems yet again to have become dominated by the privately educated, rather than working class boys like Michael Caine or Bob Hoskins’
Lionel Bart’s pre-Oliver! stage hit Fings Ain’t Wot They Used T’Be is currently being revived at the Theatre Royal in the East End. I wonder what London audiences today will make of it. Joan Littlewood, the legendary producer who got the original 1959 production together, was evangelical about the need for working-class actors not only to be seen and heard but to be heard in their original voices, untouched by Rada and its belief that only received pronunciation bestowed the authority required of all real actors. The following decade gave us a slew of famous figures from genuinely working-class origins — Michael Caine and Terence Stamp (pictured), both London boys, became bona fide Hollywood stars — and finally it seemed that working-class actors had broken out of their “character and comedy” ghetto.

That era is as dead as the notion of Swinging London. Like our political class, acting seems yet again to have become dominated by the privately educated. The bullishly agitprop-spouting Littlewood would doubtless be horrified at the way in which economic restraints and the breakdown in social mobility have led to a remarkable rise in solidly public school performers, and she’d be right.

But it’s not the whole story. Of all the changes that have taken place in the capital in the past couple of decades, the gradual disappearance of traditional working-class communities, indeed of working-class identity itself, is the most stark. As an older Lambeth resident says in Michael Collins’s wonderful book about London’s working class, The Likes of Us, “It’s like we were never here.”EastEnders, the BBC’s series of largely working-class life in the modern East End, is little more than a polite fiction. 

What this means is that audiences who are still quite versed in, as it were, the more upmarket costume drama aspects of London’s identity will have little familiarity with that group of people who once made up the bulk of its population. No working-class culture, no working-class actors. Fings definitely ain’t wot they used t’be.

Bob Hoskins, who died last month, was born far from the sound of Bow Bells (in Bury St Edmunds) but his popular persona was certainly that of the rough but goodnatured cockney. Again, his voice — superficially threatening yet warm, humorous, even innocent, underneath — must strike younger audiences unfamiliar with London’s past social terrain as exotic, even a bit corny, rather like Dick Van Dyke’s infamous cockney impersonation in Mary Poppins. But it was the kind of voice that surrounded me growing up in the Sixties and Seventies.

Two of Hoskins’s most memorable films, The Long Good Friday, set amid the decay of London’s docklands in the Seventies before gentrification set in, andMona Lisa, in which he played a driver charged with ferrying a high-class call girl, depicted a city which was either in decline or simply hole-in-the-wall seedy. It always seemed particularly hard for London to rise to the occasion on film; its grey tattiness always worked best as the backdrop for a certain sort of clichéd urban grittiness. Too heavy for romance and too parochial for big scale action — it was always more The Sweeney than The French Connection — London only really came into its own as an all-purpose setting for Olden Times. The majestic colonnades of the Royal Naval Hospital, just along the road from me on the banks of the river at Greenwich, have stood in for everything from Tsarist St Petersburg (for Crime and Punishment) to revolutionary Paris (Les Misérables) and been pressed into service for enough movies set in 18th-century Whitehall to give them an identity crisis.

This cinematic treatment of London has certainly changed in the past decade or so, as it has become a different kind of city. It has gone in two distinct directions: there’s the glossy and loved-up oeuvre of Richard Curtis, or the gangster and geezer version, pioneered by Guy Ritchie, which now seems to form a whole sub-genre. Rupert Everett beautifully summed up Curtis when he described him as the Leni Riefenstahl of Blair’s Britain: all liberal sensibility, multicultural harmony and well-meaning posh chaps. When seen from a Notting Hill window, this shiny, happy London — easy in its own skin, as the cliché has it — certainly looks like a great place to be. Less inviting on the other hand but with a new, harsh glamour, the crime-ridden world of movies such as RocknRolla and Layer Cake portrays a city of designer suits, good-looking hard men and billionaire interlopers.

What these pictures of London have in common, however, is a distinct air of self-consciousness. While we might recognise aspects of the city in each, neither version feels genuinely familiar. Few of Curtis’s characters could now afford to inhabit their beloved West London, which, with its acres of empty investment properties, is in danger of becoming a ghost town. And Ritchie’s duckers and divers look increasingly like exercises in masculine nostalgia. Neither Michael Caine nor Bob Hoskins would, I’m sure, feel much at home in either landscape.

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50 reasons to be proud

Peterr Whittle 1I received the following message today from UKIP’s Culture Spokesman and London MEP candidate, Peter Whittle, ahead of Thursday’s EU elections.

With the merchants of doom saying that the UK can’t survive in the modern world outside of the EU, it is worth remembering what the English and our Scots, Welsh and Northern Irish cousins in the UK have achieved and given to the world.

It should also serve as a reminder to those contemplating voting ‘Yes’ for Independence in Scotland how much better off we are working together

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