A free country put to the test

As seen in my previous piece, London Mayor and Uxbridge MP Boris Johnson has stated that it would be difficult to ban the flying of the Islamic State flag as this is a ‘free country’. (Despite ignoring the clear breaches of the anti-terror and public order acts that it entails).

St George and Hizb flags

Tomorrow sees the annual Al Quds day parade in London, where the flag of the proscribed terrorist group Hizbollah (Pictured above, which came in to my possession at last year’s event) will be flown on the streets in breach of the same laws and no doubt with no response from the Police.

To see if Boris is prepared to be true to his word, I will be peacefully counter protesting as I do each year – Anti-Semitism, homophobia, misogyny and racism have no place on the streets of our capital city. I will be carrying with me the St George Flag as also displayed in the picture – Let’s see if The Metropolitan Police show me the same consideration that they showed to the IS supporter at Westminster. I somehow doubt it.

Al Quds 2014 - march past

 

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An open letter to Boris Johnson re ISIS

After Boris Johnson’s LBC radio show, I have just emailed the following message to him

Dear Boris

Boris-Johnson-close-up

As a constituent of yours, I was alarmed to hear your comments regarding the flying of an ISIS flag in London on LBC radio today, as confirmed in the following tract from The Independent

The Isis flag should not be banned by law because Britain is a “free country”, Boris Johnson has said.

The Mayor of London said he did not want to see the flag of the so-called Islamic State flying anywhere but said that banning it in law could prove unworkable.

“I don’t like people carrying the ISIS flag … I think a balance has got to be struck,” he told LBC radio.

May I draw to your attention the following passage from The 2003 Terrorism Act

Proscription makes it a criminal offence to:

  • wear clothing or carry or display articles in public in such a way or in such circumstances as arouse reasonable suspicion that an individual is a member or supporter of the proscribed organisation (section 13).

The penalties for proscription offences under sections 11 and 12 are a maximum of 10 years in prison and/or a fine. The maximum penalty for a section 13 offence is 6 months in prison and/or a fine not exceeding £5,000.

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