How Britain suffered a second “1066”

A guest post from UKIP Reigate’s Peter Lindsay

As we face a Fake Brexit, we should ponder just how it has come about that while nearly 60% of us (if you adjust the actual % vote for Brexit – 52% – for the fear factor generated by Project Fear) want an independent Britain, 85% of our “representatives” (sic) in Parliament – those MPs who supported Remain – want our continued subservience to a foreign power. Are these really our representatives?

One might also ponder why it is that the same representatives have allowed mass immigration over the last 70 years to change the culture of this country, without even asking the native population whether they wanted this. The explanation is that we have been beaten in a bloodless war. To explain:

Britain has not been conquered by a foreign invader for nearly a thousand years. Not militarily, that is. But you can just as effectively “take over” a country by other means. This can be done by either (1) successfully taking over its vital institutions as a precursor to government, or (2) a revolution or coup d’etat. An example of (1) was the aftermath of the Boer War: although the British won the war, the vital institutions – media, education, civil service, local government etc. were all run by the Afrikaaners, who were the majority white population and by the 1920s they had taken over the government. An example of (2) was the Russian Revolution or French Revolution but such coups can happen over time and even without violence.

In the 20th century, Britain suffered a “pincer” attack from both outside – (2) and within – (1). Like a vice closing. Whereas our glorious Royal Navy and RAF had always beaten off a foreign invader, we found ourselves wide open to these more subtle attacks and so we were eventually beaten by them.

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Rumours of the demise of UKIP are greatly exaggerated

The following article is the opinion of the author and does not necessarily represent the official view of the party

Uxbridge street stall Oct 2013 with MS MG and Ilyas
It is often said that a week is a long time in politics – with the events of the last seven days it has certainly seemed that way!

Following on from the surprise resignation of leader Diane James MEP after just 18 days in the role, we have now seen media headlines surrounding an altercation between two of our MEP’s in the EU Parliament in Strasbourg.

The Party is currently investigating what actually happened and as such it would be wrong for me to speculate before that investigation is concluded. I feel sure that we all wish Steven Woolfe MEP, a personal friend and a thoroughly decent man, a speedy recovery.

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A Perspective on the EU from a citizen of a former superstate

Following the stunning win of the Leave campaign in Thursday’s EU Referendum, a piece worth looking at from a British National who lived under a previous state cobbled together from separate countries. The UK now has the chance to re-engage with the rest of the world as a forward looking, globally trading, independent nation state.

EU Parliament

I am a Slovenian national by birth and a British national by choice. And I support Brexit. Why?

Every life is unique. You have not walked in my shoes, and I fully appreciate that I have not walked in yours. I have been asked to relate the benefit of my experience. I hope that you may find a different perspective helpful to your own thinking, but do with it what you think is right.

When I was born, Slovenia was a part of Yugoslavia. The nation I was born into was not free, nor was it independent. It yearned for its independence for centuries, if not millenia, and it had to pay for its independence in blood. I had to work hard to obtain the nationality of a free country and I value and cherish it. I find it painful to think that any nation would contemplate giving up its freedom and independence voluntarily.

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Europe and You – The magazine that doesn’t tell it as it is

BSE paper 1

This morning I received a 4 page newspaper in the post from Britain Stronger in Europe (BSE) entitled ‘Europe and You’.

My friends in Essex had received this earlier in the week, with this mornings edition being slightly altered for London.

What hadn’t been altered was the misleading information contained in it’s pages – if you have had this through your letterbox, here are the facts that contradict the stance of the ‘remain’ campaign –

Europe and You – Even the title is misleading. This referendum is about whether we wish to remain part of the European Union (EU), a political union of 28 of the 48 countries in Europe, not the continental land mass that makes up Europe.

The Six key facts you need to know – Let us take these one at a time –

1 – Over 3 million jobs are linked to our trade with the EU. The reality is that approximately 3.4 million people work for companies that trade with other countries that are in the EU – This is around 10% of our workforce. This trade will not disappear if we leave the EU and it is not in the interests of the companies in the EU to stop trading with us. Indeed, far more jobs in other EU countries depend on their trade with the UK than jobs here depend on EU countries. Also bear in mind that our most profitable trade is with countries outside of the EU – By leaving, we can negotiate our own trade deals and increase trade and therefore jobs in growing economies around the world whilst trade on the whole in the EU member states is in decline.It is also worth noting that whilst 10% of our companies deal with the EU, 90% do not but are still bound by the rules and red tape inflicted on them, hampering competitiveness.

2 – Being in the EU means cheaper prices in our shops, saving you on average £450 per year. Ignoring the fact that the source of this is the EU Commission itself (Turkeys don’t vote for Christmas), the disastrous EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) costs billions a year in subsidy paid to inefficient farmers in other EU countries. A combination of quotas, taxes, subsidies and other policies all push up the prices that we pay for food. For example, New Zealand Lamb is 18% more expensive in the UK than the USA due to EU policies.

Research by Ryan Bourne of the IEA (Institute of Economic Affairs), ‘Low pay and the cost of living’, shows that Beef is 36% more expensive, turkey 22% more, lamb 11% more, wheat 15% more, chicken 22% more and potatoes 10% more due to the EU. On average, a family of 2 adults and 2 children would save £45 per month on their food bills if we left the EU. Research by Alan Matthews and Business for Britain backs up this hypothesis.

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Parliament 2015

English Patriot will be featuring posts from guest writers in the New Year offering a different perspective on world and domestic events. Here is the first of our guest writers, John Planter, with his take on the current state of UK Politics…………………

 

Inspired by an excellent original article by American Judge Anna von Reitz observing events in America.

Acknowledgement to where some of her words have been shamelessly borrowed 

Parliament from the Thames

You can see why Parliament acts as it does. From their perspective they are a permanent ruling class London club with members that change now and again.

It is the rest of the country, us, you and me, the serfs who are responsible – we are the cause and the solution to the Parliament problem. It is us, we have forgotten who we are and what our powers are and what powers we delegated to Parliament and how we can also take back any power delegated to them. This also applies to the councils, and the Monarch – the Monarch represents people who represent Monarch.

 

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The English floods – What the Politicians won’t tell you

The news over Christmas has been full of the wet weather conditions wreaking havoc in the North of England and along the Scottish Borders. Whilst the media is full of talk of the cause being down to ‘climate change’ the reality is somewhat different as laid out here by Philip Walling in an article reproduced from The Newcastle Chronicle –

Amid all the devastation and recrimination over the floods in Cumbria hardly anybody mentions one factor that may not be the sole cause, but certainly hasn’t helped.

That is the almost complete cessation of dredging of our rivers since we were required to accept the European Water Framework Directive (EWF) into UK law in 2000.

Hayes Park

Yet until then, for all of recorded history, it almost went without saying that a watercourse needed to be big enough to take any water that flowed into it, otherwise it would overflow and inundate the surrounding land and houses.

Every civilisation has known that, except apparently ours. It is just common sense. City authorities and, before them, manors and towns and villages, organised themselves to make sure their watercourses were cleansed, deepened and sometimes embanked to hold whatever water they had to carry away.

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Cheap flights and mobile phone calls – Cameron’s reasons to stay in the EU

Cameron outside parliamentSpeaking recently, Prime Minister David Cameron (left) praised the EU for making short haul flights cheaper and cutting the cost of mobile phone calls whilst roaming abroad.

Ignoring the real reasons why our membership is bad for the UK such as surrender of sovereignty, red tape strangling business, our inability to control our borders and the huge amounts we pay to be members of this undemocratic institution, Cameron’s appeal to the public shows how little he will actually be able to change in his ‘renegotiation’ and lays bare the shallowness of his arguments.

 

However, let’s look at the reality of what he is saying.

1 – Cheap Flights

The Prime Minister’s claim that the EU has promoted the ability of airlines to provide cheaper flights for both business and holiday traffic misses a number of major points.

Firstly, business flights are on the decrease across the EU and the world in general. With the rise of ever better internet and communications technology, more companies are using this technology for business rather than flying to meetings overseas. Therefore, any EU intervention to make flights cheaper (Which I don’t actually believe has happened anyway) will not have a massive effect on business.

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