St George’s Day. How the EU affects England

The following briefing paper was launched by the campaign group, Better Off Out, on St George’s Day and explains well what our continued membership of the EU would mean for England.

Better off Out logo 2

In 1973, Britain joined what was then the European Economic community, before reaffirming its commitment in a 1975 referendum that explicitly described the community as “The Common Market”.

At the height of the Cold War, when Britain’s economy was stagnating and the country was becoming renowned as the ‘Sick Man of Europe’, it was sold as a purely economic arrangement between nine Western European nations. At our moment of entry in 1973, the contemporary Prime Minister was unequivocal: “There are some in this country who fear that in going into Europe we shall in some way sacrifice independence and sovereignty. These fears, I need hardly say, are completely unjustified.” – Ted Heath, television broadcast, January 1973

At first, we were enthusiastic members of the club, with even Margaret Thatcher – who signed us up to the Single European act, which promoted a combined European foreign policy and gave more power to the European Parliament initially in favour of membership. Since Black Wednesday in 1992, however, our relationship has been grudging at best, with the UK forced to withdraw from the Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM), before deciding not to join the disastrous single currency project (despite Tony Blair’s best efforts). Forty-one years on from our first referendum, it is clear that this is no longer solely about economics (if it ever had been), with most of our laws made in Brussels, membership costs running to the tens of billions per year, and plans afoot for an EU army – very little of which the British people want any part.

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Dispelling the myths around BREXIT

CD in Yiewsley with GBDuring our ongoing discussions with people on street stalls surrounding the EU Referendum a number of questions keep coming up.
Below, Gerard Batten MEP dispels the myths created by the Remain campaign about the dangers of leaving the EU
1) Would leaving the EU endanger jobs and trade, and could the EU put up trade barriers against the UK?

When we leave the EU it cannot put up arbitrary trade barriers against the UK as that would against World Trade Organisation (WTO) rules, which all EU countries agree to and which govern world trade. And even if they could why would they want to? We have a massive trade deficit with the EU – they sell us far more than we sell them.
Britain currently exports goods and services to the EU to the value of £228.9 billion, whereas their exports to us amount to £290.6 billion: therefore we have a trade deficit with the EU of £61.7 billion. Germany, Spain, France and Italy etc.will still want to sell us their cars, wine and holidays etc. Trade will continue as normal. [i]
And remember, Britain is the fifth largest economy in the world and we are a world trading nation: and while we have a trade deficit with the EU we have a trade surplus with the rest of the world.   Our trading success lies in four hundred years of experience; English being the international language of business and science; and the trust that foreign companies put in the English legal system and contract law.

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Europe and You – The magazine that doesn’t tell it as it is

BSE paper 1

This morning I received a 4 page newspaper in the post from Britain Stronger in Europe (BSE) entitled ‘Europe and You’.

My friends in Essex had received this earlier in the week, with this mornings edition being slightly altered for London.

What hadn’t been altered was the misleading information contained in it’s pages – if you have had this through your letterbox, here are the facts that contradict the stance of the ‘remain’ campaign –

Europe and You – Even the title is misleading. This referendum is about whether we wish to remain part of the European Union (EU), a political union of 28 of the 48 countries in Europe, not the continental land mass that makes up Europe.

The Six key facts you need to know – Let us take these one at a time –

1 – Over 3 million jobs are linked to our trade with the EU. The reality is that approximately 3.4 million people work for companies that trade with other countries that are in the EU – This is around 10% of our workforce. This trade will not disappear if we leave the EU and it is not in the interests of the companies in the EU to stop trading with us. Indeed, far more jobs in other EU countries depend on their trade with the UK than jobs here depend on EU countries. Also bear in mind that our most profitable trade is with countries outside of the EU – By leaving, we can negotiate our own trade deals and increase trade and therefore jobs in growing economies around the world whilst trade on the whole in the EU member states is in decline.It is also worth noting that whilst 10% of our companies deal with the EU, 90% do not but are still bound by the rules and red tape inflicted on them, hampering competitiveness.

2 – Being in the EU means cheaper prices in our shops, saving you on average £450 per year. Ignoring the fact that the source of this is the EU Commission itself (Turkeys don’t vote for Christmas), the disastrous EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) costs billions a year in subsidy paid to inefficient farmers in other EU countries. A combination of quotas, taxes, subsidies and other policies all push up the prices that we pay for food. For example, New Zealand Lamb is 18% more expensive in the UK than the USA due to EU policies.

Research by Ryan Bourne of the IEA (Institute of Economic Affairs), ‘Low pay and the cost of living’, shows that Beef is 36% more expensive, turkey 22% more, lamb 11% more, wheat 15% more, chicken 22% more and potatoes 10% more due to the EU. On average, a family of 2 adults and 2 children would save £45 per month on their food bills if we left the EU. Research by Alan Matthews and Business for Britain backs up this hypothesis.

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Cheap flights and mobile phone calls – Cameron’s reasons to stay in the EU

Cameron outside parliamentSpeaking recently, Prime Minister David Cameron (left) praised the EU for making short haul flights cheaper and cutting the cost of mobile phone calls whilst roaming abroad.

Ignoring the real reasons why our membership is bad for the UK such as surrender of sovereignty, red tape strangling business, our inability to control our borders and the huge amounts we pay to be members of this undemocratic institution, Cameron’s appeal to the public shows how little he will actually be able to change in his ‘renegotiation’ and lays bare the shallowness of his arguments.


However, let’s look at the reality of what he is saying.

1 – Cheap Flights

The Prime Minister’s claim that the EU has promoted the ability of airlines to provide cheaper flights for both business and holiday traffic misses a number of major points.

Firstly, business flights are on the decrease across the EU and the world in general. With the rise of ever better internet and communications technology, more companies are using this technology for business rather than flying to meetings overseas. Therefore, any EU intervention to make flights cheaper (Which I don’t actually believe has happened anyway) will not have a massive effect on business.

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EU Referendum – Time to show our fighting spirit

Today saw the official launch of the UKIP campaign to educate people on the failings of the EU in the run up to the promised Referendum on our membership. (Below)

As Nigel Farage rightly pointed out, those who wish to keep us in the EU have been quick off the mark and are already getting increased airtime on TV and in the columns of the national newspapers. Richard Branson has been very vocal about our need to remain a part of the superstate, even suggesting that we need to re look at joining the Euro currency which has brought so much misery to the peoples of Europe, most notably Greece – Interestingly enough, he lives in the Caribbean and recently moved his Virgin headquarters to non-EU Switzerland!

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Public meeting in West Drayton

UK and EU flag

Why you should vote ‘No’ to the EU – A public meeting to outline the case for UK Independence

UKIP Hillingdon are proud to announce our first public meeting to put the case for EU withdrawal (BREXIT). This is a non-aligned meeting where people from all political parties and none are welcome to attend, listen to the arguments and participate in our popular question and answer sessions

Speakers –

GerardBattenofficeGerard Batten MEP – A founder member of UKIP in 1993 and London MEP since 2004, Gerard has seen the inside workings of the Brussels Parliament and how it impacts on our rights and freedoms as British Citizens





Mark HughesMark Hughes – Listed in the Top 100 fund managers by Citywire , financial expert Mark Hughes has run his own investment company since 1997. Mark believes our businesses and economy will flourish outside of the unnecessary regulations imposed by the EU





Chaired by UKIP Hayes & Harlington spokesman Cliff Dixon


Date – Thursday 23rd July – Meeting starts at 8.30pm

Venue – Yiewsley & W. Drayton Community Centre, Harmondsworth Rd, West Drayton, UB7 9JL

For further details, please contact UKIP Hillingdon

Tel – 07939 223659                Email –


A picture of life outside the European Union (EU) – 2020

You will hear a lot of scare stories about how our country will struggle if we leave the EU from those in the ‘Yes’ campaign.

Here is what it could really be like……..


EDP pictures 028The year is 2020 and Britain is adjusting to life and thriving outside of the declining European Union.

Free from the need to negotiate trade deals via unelected EU commissioners, a series of agreements with the emerging nations of the world have boosted exports and revitalised our industries. Unwilling to lose their largest European market, the remaining EU states have swiftly confirmed free trade agreements with the UK and the job losses predicted by the ‘Yes’ campaign fail to materialise.

Re-engaging with our traditional world partners, most notably the Commonwealth, has invigorated our shipping industries and cities such as Liverpool and Glasgow once again hum to the sound of machinery as exports grow and vessels come and go, offloading such produce as New Zealand lamb and transporting out machinery exports, pharmaceuticals and high tech equipment.

With much of the EU red tape removed from our small and medium industries they once again start to drive economic growth. Repeal of EU diktat on renewable energy and the large combustion plant directive means that energy once again becomes cheaper, driving down costs for businesses and making them more competitive on the world stage.

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