UKIP – Job done or only just started?

With the resignation of both Douglas Carswell and Mark Reckless, many in the media are now saying that UKIP has achieved its goal and it is no longer relevant on the political landscape.

Indeed, the aforementioned Mr Carswell has been gloating on his Twitter feed about a council byelection in his area where the Tories have taken a seat from UKIP , claiming that many Kippers think ‘job done’.

So, what is the reality? With the triggering of Article 50 and the initial founding reason for UKIP (Leaving the EU) looking like a reality, what have UKIP got left to offer?

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Welfare Reform bill – My reply to John McDonnell MP

Dear John

I saw your eye catching response to the Welfare Reform Bill in Parliament on line (Below)

You raise some very valid points but as usual fail to identify the root causes of the issues in our area.

As UKIP’s Hayes & Harlington spokesman and effectively the opposition party in the constituency, here is my reply to your speech.

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The truth about Hillingdon Council’s ‘Financial Prudence’

Hillingdon council cabinetOur national debt recently exceeded the £1.5 trillion mark – We spend more money in interest payments on the debt annually than we do on defence. Locally, our Conservative Council constantly tell you about their outstanding financial record in much the same way as their national party do at Westminster. ‘Council tax frozen’ is one of their favourite cries, neglecting to mention that Hillingdon levies one of the highest council tax bills in London already.

Their ‘financial prudence’ claims are further tested by the write off of £2.5 million of your money in 2011 in a failed Icelandic Bank, with millions still owing from Landsbanki and Heritable.

 

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A picture of life outside the European Union (EU) – 2020

You will hear a lot of scare stories about how our country will struggle if we leave the EU from those in the ‘Yes’ campaign.

Here is what it could really be like……..

 

EDP pictures 028The year is 2020 and Britain is adjusting to life and thriving outside of the declining European Union.

Free from the need to negotiate trade deals via unelected EU commissioners, a series of agreements with the emerging nations of the world have boosted exports and revitalised our industries. Unwilling to lose their largest European market, the remaining EU states have swiftly confirmed free trade agreements with the UK and the job losses predicted by the ‘Yes’ campaign fail to materialise.

Re-engaging with our traditional world partners, most notably the Commonwealth, has invigorated our shipping industries and cities such as Liverpool and Glasgow once again hum to the sound of machinery as exports grow and vessels come and go, offloading such produce as New Zealand lamb and transporting out machinery exports, pharmaceuticals and high tech equipment.

With much of the EU red tape removed from our small and medium industries they once again start to drive economic growth. Repeal of EU diktat on renewable energy and the large combustion plant directive means that energy once again becomes cheaper, driving down costs for businesses and making them more competitive on the world stage.

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21st Century Economics

Forwarded to me by our UKIP PPC for Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner, Gerard Barry – Everyman’s guide to current economic policy?

yeoldgeorgeMary is the proprietor of a bar in Dublin . She realises that virtually all of her customers are unemployed alcoholics and, as such, can no longer afford to patronise her bar. To solve this problem, she comes up with new marketing plan that allows her customers to drink now, but pay later. She keeps track of the drinks consumed on a ledger (thereby granting the customers loans). Word gets around about Mary’s “drink now, pay later” marketing strategy and, as a result, increasing numbers of customers flood into Mary’s bar. Soon she has the largest sales volume for any bar in Dublin. By providing her customers’ freedom from immediate payment demands, Mary gets no resistance when, at regular intervals, she substantially increases her prices for wine and beer, the most consumed beverages. Consequently, Mary’s gross sales volume increases massively.

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Talking about the 99.7%

In light of the recent highlighting of a small number of UKIP misdemeanours in the national media over the last week, the following article went up on The Huffington Post from our North East MEP, Jonathan Arnott, earlier today. It lays out far better than I can what UKIP is really about….

Jonathan Arnott MEPI’m one of the 99.7%.

In the media, we hear a lot about the 0.3% – those candidates for Ukip who’ve said or done stupid things, things which neither Ukip nor anyone else in the country would. They’ve had the oxygen of publicity for far too long. I want to talk about the 99.7%, about what we believe.

We’re the champions of democracy, the people who believe that if your MP is involved in a scandal you should, if you have enough support, be able to force a vote to remove them. We’re the people who put that into practice: when Douglas Carswell MP and Mark Reckless MP joined Ukip, both of them immediately put themselves before the voters in their constituencies and asked them to re-elect them. They did. But before Ukip came along, politicians who defected never bothered to consult the people that matter: you. We’re the people who want the public to be able to force politicians to listen through calling a referendum on key issues, to drag democracy kicking and screaming into the 21st Century.

 

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The truth about mass,uncontrolled immigration

Neil Hamilton wrote the following article, which was published in the Sunday Express on 7th July, summing up a number of problems with uncontrolled mass immigration.  I reproduce his article in full:

Neil Hamilton

A series of government reports last week exposed the horrifying break-up of traditional Britain.  The latest census revealed that immigrants account for 25 per cent of the population of our largest cities.  Nearly a third of residents of these cities are members of a non-white ethnic minority and almost one in 10 homes has not a single person speaking English as a first language.  Department for Education figures reveal three in 10 primary school pupils are from ethnic minorities.  More than one million children do not speak English as their first language at home.  In large parts of London native English-speakers are in the minority.  A Home Office report, Social And Public Service Impacts Of International Migration At The Local Level, said that every year since 1998 net migration has been above 100,000, peaking at 255,000 in 2010.

We have never known anything like this in the history of these islands.  With the exception of wartime, more people immigrated to the UK in a single year, 2010, than from 1066 to 1950. Between 2004-2011 the number of Poles living in the UK leapt from 69,000 to 687,000.  The report concluded that half of Britons report strain on schools, hospitals, transport, housing and employment as a result of mass immigration.  While acknowledging the hugely important work carried out by foreign doctors and nurses, researchers revealed the pressure exerted on the NHS. 
In a single year 73 per cent of TB cases and almost 60 per cent of newly diagnosed HIV cases involved people born outside the UK.

And 80 per cent of hepatitis B-infected UK blood donors were born abroad. Experts questioned by the Home Office agreed the “high birth rates of some migrant groups produce additional demands on midwifery, maternity and health visiting services”.  Health staff said that appointments and visits could take twice as long where patients had poor English, putting significant pressure on other areas.  In housing, large numbers of low-skilled migrants wanting private rented property are driving up prices. In the jobs market hundreds of thousands of immigrants chasing low-skilled jobs have driven pay down to minimum wage levels. With a million young people aged 16-24 out of work this is madness.

The last Labour government encouraged mass immigration “to rub the Right’s nose in diversity” according to Tony Blair’s adviser Andrew Neather. They also calculated it would boost the number of Labour voters.  The scale of migration has been so great that irreversible changes have been made to large swathes of the country. Ethnic division is a reality and the problem is getting worse, with 29 million Romanians and Bulgarians potentially to add to the mix next year.  Although much of the blame lies with Labour ministers, including Ed Miliband, the Tories are little better.  What could David Cameron have been thinking when he said last week that he wants to expand the EU as far as Kazakhstan and the Urals?  If you liked opening our borders to every Romanian and Bulgarian you’ll just love the Kazakhs, Moldavians and Azerbaijanis. Not to mention 75 million Turks, whose application to join the EU he also enthusiastically supports.

Boris Johnson at Talk London event

Unfortunately Cameron isn’t the only swivel-eyed loon in the Conservative Party. A few days ago Boris Johnson backed the call by a Tory backbench MP for an amnesty for up to a million illegal immigrants.  In the next 15 years the UK population will grow by over seven million to 70 million. Five million of that will be due to immigration.  No wonder Tory planning minister Nick Boles is so manic about the need to concrete over three million acres of England.  We must build a new home every seven minutes for new migrants. England is with Holland the most crowded country in Europe, excluding city states. We have 400 people per sq km compared with 252 in Germany and 114 in France.

We have been lied to by Conservative, Labour and Liberal politicians throughout my lifetime as to the scale and effect of immigration.  Their stock riposte to those speaking out was to accuse us of being racist.  It is now clear we were right. The debate was always about space, not race…and the preservation of England’s cultural identity.